Difference between revisions of "Programmer Guide/Command Reference/TOKEN"

From STX Wiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Line 9: Line 9:
  
 
;<var>index</var>
 
;<var>index</var>
:The zero-based index of the token to return (0 &le; <var>index</var> &le; <var>nWords</var>-1), <var>nWords</var> meaning the number tokens available in the <var>string</var> argument.
+
:The zero-based index of the token to return (0 &le; <var>index</var> &le; <var>nWords</var>-1, <var>nWords</var> being the number tokens available in the <var>string</var> argument).
  
 
;<var>string</var>&hellip;
 
;<var>string</var>&hellip;

Revision as of 16:10, 2 May 2014

var := TOKEN [ /Silent ] [ /D=delimiter ] /- index string

This command, similar to the WORD command, tokenises a string into words separated by a delimiter specified with the /delimiter option.

The command returns the respective token or an empty string if index is not a number or if it is outside the range 0…nTokens-1, nTokens indicating the number of available tokens in the string argument.

When using TOKEN, do not forget to use the /- option before the first argument (and after any other options). Without the /- option, any argument starting with a slash will be mistaken for an option.

index
The zero-based index of the token to return (0 ≤ indexnWords-1, nWords being the number tokens available in the string argument).
string
A string to tokenise. If you supply more than one string, they will still be considered one string, following STx rules for argument concatenation.
/Silent
If set, the function sets the return code on failure. Otherwise, it sets the return code to 0, even if the parameters are invalid.
/Delimiter=delimiter
Set the delimiter character. The default delimiter is a blank character.

Example

#str := set 'to be, or not to be, that is the question'
#var := token /D=, /- 1 $#str
um The second comma separated value in the string "$#str" is "$#var"
// will return ' or not to be'